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Eur Respir J. 2015 Jul;46(1):107-14. doi: 10.1183/09031936.00204914. Epub 2015 Apr 2.

Sleeping on animal fur is related to asthma outcomes in later childhood.

Author information

1
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology I, Neuherberg, Germany christina.tischer@helmholtz-muenchen.de.
2
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology I, Neuherberg, Germany.
3
Dept of Environmental Immunology, UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
4
Pediatric Outpatient Dept, Bad Honnef, Germany.
5
Marien-Hospital Wesel, Research Institute, Wesel, Germany.

Abstract

Animal furs might represent a "proxy" for high and diverse microbial exposures within a critical time window of immune development. We assessed whether sleeping on animal fur shortly after birth is associated with asthma and atopy up to the age of 10 years. LISAplus participants (n=2441) from Munich and Leipzig, Germany, were included in the analysis. Animal fur exposure, cofactors and health outcomes were obtained periodically up to 10 years of age by parental questionnaires. Information on specific IgE to aeroallergens was available at 10 years. Cytokine-producing peripheral T-cells were assessed in a subgroup of children at 2 and 3 years. Confounder-adjusted associations were evaluated using logistic regression analyses. Sleeping on animal fur was very common (55%). In adjusted logistic regression analyses, sleeping on animal fur was inversely associated with recurrent early wheezing at 4 years (adjusted OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.61-0.93) and current asthma at 6 years (adjusted OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.31-1.01). Furthermore, sleeping on animal fur during the first 3 months of life was significantly associated with a persistently stimulated interferon-γ response until the age of 3 years. Animal fur could be an effective measure of creating environments associated with higher microbial exposure.

PMID:
25837030
DOI:
10.1183/09031936.00204914
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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