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Gastroenterology. 2015 Jul;149(1):110-118.e4. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2015.03.045. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Findings From a Randomized Controlled Trial of Fecal Transplantation for Patients With Ulcerative Colitis.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands; Departments of Bacteriology and Immunology and Veterinary Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
5
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.y.ponsioen@amc.nl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Several case series have reported the effects of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for ulcerative colitis (UC). We assessed the efficacy and safety of FMT for patients with UC in a double-blind randomized trial.

METHODS:

Patients with mild to moderately active UC (n = 50) were assigned to groups that underwent FMT with feces from healthy donors or were given autologous fecal microbiota (control); each transplant was administered via nasoduodenal tube at the start of the study and 3 weeks later. The study was performed at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam from June 2011 through May 2014. The composite primary end point was clinical remission (simple clinical colitis activity index scores ≤2) combined with ≥1-point decrease in the Mayo endoscopic score at week 12. Secondary end points were safety and microbiota composition by phylogenetic microarray in fecal samples.

RESULTS:

Thirty-seven patients completed the primary end point assessment. In the intention-to-treat analysis, 7 of 23 patients who received fecal transplants from healthy donors (30.4%) and 5 of 25 controls (20.0%) achieved the primary end point (P = .51). In the per-protocol analysis, 7 of 17 patients who received fecal transplants from healthy donors (41.2%) and 5 of 20 controls (25.0%) achieved the primary end point (P = .29). Serious adverse events occurred in 4 patients (2 in the FMT group), but these were not considered to be related to the FMT. At 12 weeks, the microbiota of responders in the FMT group was similar to that of their healthy donors; remission was associated with proportions of Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this phase 2 trial, there was no statistically significant difference in clinical and endoscopic remission between patients with UC who received fecal transplants from healthy donors and those who received their own fecal microbiota, which may be due to limited numbers. However, the microbiota of responders had distinct features from that of nonresponders, warranting further study. ClinicalTrials.gov Number: NCT01650038.

KEYWORDS:

Fecal Microbiota Transplantation; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID:
25836986
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2015.03.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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