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Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Sep;50(9):1427-39. doi: 10.1007/s00127-015-1051-0. Epub 2015 Apr 3.

Physical diseases as predictors of suicide in older adults: a nationwide, register-based cohort study.

Author information

1
The Research Unit, Mental Health Centre Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400, Copenhagen NV, Denmark. Annette.erlangsen@regionh.dk.
2
Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. Annette.erlangsen@regionh.dk.
3
Institute of Regional Health Service, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
4
The Mental Health Research Unit, Aabenraa, Denmark.
5
Department of Psychiatry, and Office for Aging, Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The objective of the study was to examine the association between 39 physical diseases and death by suicide in older adults.

METHODS:

Individual-level register data on all older adults aged 65 years and over living in Denmark during 1990-2009 (N = 1,849,110) were analysed. Rate ratios were calculated for 39 physical diseases while adjusting for period, age group, conjugal status, income, physical comorbidity, and psychiatric disorders.

RESULTS:

In all, 4792 older adults aged 65+ died by suicide during the follow-up of >16 million person-years. Gastrointestinal cancer was linked to a rate ratio of 2.5 (95 % CI 1.9-3.5) in men while excess suicide risk for women with brain cancer was 3.5 (95 % CI 1.1-10.8) within three years of diagnosis. Men and women diagnosed with liver diseases within three years experienced a 2.7- (95 % CI 1.7-4.2) and 4.0- (95 % CI 2.5-6.4) fold higher risk of suicide, respectively, than those not diagnosed. Elevated risks of suicide were identified for lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, breast cancer, genital cancer, bladder cancer, lymph node cancer, epilepsy, cerebrovascular diseases, cataract, heart diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders (COPD), gastrointestinal disease, liver disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, prostate disorders, male genital disorders, and spinal fracture when compared to persons not diagnosed within three years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Multiple physical diseases were linked to increased risks of suicide in older adults. Increased attention to suicidal ideation and risk assessment might be warranted during the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Chronic Illness; Disease; Physical disease; Suicide

PMID:
25835959
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-015-1051-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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