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Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2014;84(1-2):27-34. doi: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000190.

Vitamin D supplementation and serum levels of magnesium and selenium in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: gender dimorphic changes.

Author information

1
Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and Biomarkers Research Program, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
2
Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and Biomarkers Research Program, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and Clinical Pharmacy Department, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
3
Biomarkers Research Program, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
4
Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and College of Food Science & Agriculture, Department of Food Science & Nutrition, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
5
Riyadh College of Health Sciences, King Saud University, Ministry of Higher Education, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
6
Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on circulating levels of magnesium and selenium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 126 adult Saudi patients (55 men and 71 women, mean age 53.6±10.7 years) with controlled T2DM were randomly recruited for the study. All subjects were given vitamin D3 tablets (2000 IU/day) for six months. Follow-up mean concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25-(OH) vitamin D] significantly increased in both men (34.1±12.4 to 57.8±17.0 nmol/L) and women (35.7±13.5 to 60.1±18.5 nmol/L, p<0.001), while levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) decreased significantly in both men (1.6±0.17 to 0.96±0.10 pmol/L, p=0.003) and women (1.6±0.17 to 1.0±0.14 pmol/L, p=0.02). In addition, there was a significant increase in serum levels of selenium and magnesium in men and women (p-values<0.001 and 0.04, respectively) after follow-up. In women, a significant correlation was observed between delta change (variables at six months-variable at baseline) of serum magnesium versus high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (r=0.36, p=0.006) and fasting glucose (r=-0.33, p=0.01). In men, there was a significant correlation between serum selenium and triglycerides (r=0.32, p=0.04). Vitamin D supplementation improves serum concentrations of magnesium and selenium in a gender-dependent manner, which in turn could affect several cardiometabolic parameters such as glucose and lipids.

KEYWORDS:

Saudi Arabia; diabetes; hypovitaminosis D; magnesium; selenium

PMID:
25835233
DOI:
10.1024/0300-9831/a000190
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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