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Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces. 2015 May 1;129:79-86. doi: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2015.03.026. Epub 2015 Mar 17.

Radiosensitizing effect of zinc oxide and silica nanocomposites on cancer cells.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, 0310 Oslo, Norway; School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway.
2
Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19059, 502 Yates Street, 108 Science Hall, Arlington, TX 76019-0059, USA.
3
School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway.
4
Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, 0310 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: petras.juzenas@rr-research.no.

Abstract

Nanoparticulates responsive to X-rays offer increased efficacy of radiation therapy. However, successful demonstrations of such nanoparticle use are limited so far due to lack of significant radiosensitizing effects or poor nanoparticle stability in a biological system. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is the most promising biocompatible material for medicinal applications. In this paper, we report preparation and characterization of scintillating ZnO/SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles. The ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles absorb ultraviolet (UV) radiation (below 360nm) and emit green fluorescence (400-750nm, maximum 550nm). Under X-ray irradiation (200kVp), the nanoparticles scintillate emitting luminescence in the region 350-700nm (maximum 420nm). The synthesized ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles are stable in a biologically relevant environment (water and cell growth medium). The potential of the ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles for radiosensitization is demonstrated in human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines (LNCaP and Du145). The nanoparticles enhance radiation-induced reduction in cell survival about 2-fold for LNCaP and 1.5-fold for Du145 cells. Radiosensitizing effect can be attributed to X-ray-induced radiocatalysis by the nanoparticles.

KEYWORDS:

Free radicals; Ionizing radiation; Radiation therapy; Radiation-induced catalysis; Radiosensitization

PMID:
25829130
DOI:
10.1016/j.colsurfb.2015.03.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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