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Cancer Treat Rev. 2015 Apr;41(4):341-53. doi: 10.1016/j.ctrv.2015.03.004. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Molecular biology and targeted therapies for urothelial carcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Oncology, Hôpital de Jolimont, Rue Ferrer 159, 7100 La Louvière, Belgium; Institut Roi Albert II, Service d'Oncologie Médicale, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc and Institut de Recherche Clinique et Expérimentale (Pole MIRO), Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200 Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: emmanuel.seront@uclouvain.be.
2
Institut Roi Albert II, Service d'Oncologie Médicale, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc and Institut de Recherche Clinique et Expérimentale (Pole MIRO), Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200 Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: jean-pascal.machiels@uclouvain.be.

Abstract

Metastatic urothelial cancer (UC) is associated with poor prognosis. In the first-line setting, platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard of care but resistance rapidly occurs. With no validated treatment proven to increase survival after platinum failure, there is an urgent unmet medical need to develop new and efficacious cytotoxic agents. A better understanding of the molecular signaling pathways regulating UC has led to the development of new and innovative therapeutic strategies. Despite this, many recent drugs show only modest activity as single agents, and combining them with standard chemotherapy does not seem to enhance efficacy. Ongoing research is producing, however, a generation of new drugs that are showing promising results in clinical trials. This paper aims to review the most important mechanisms in bladder cancer tumorigenesis and describe the new therapeutic options currently undergoing evaluation in clinical trials.

KEYWORDS:

Bladder cancer; Signaling pathways; Targeted therapies; Treatment; Tumorigenesis; Urothelial carcinoma

PMID:
25828962
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctrv.2015.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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