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Int J Cardiol. 2015;186:186-95. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.03.176. Epub 2015 Mar 17.

The combined effect of physical activity and sedentary behaviors on a clustered cardio-metabolic risk score: The Helena study.

Author information

1
Youth/Child and cARdiovascular Risk and Environmental (YCARE) Research Group, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, School of Health Science (EUCS), University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: trendo@usp.br.
2
Youth/Child and cARdiovascular Risk and Environmental (YCARE) Research Group, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, School of Health Science (EUCS), University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
3
Department of Nutrition & Dietetics, School of Health Science & Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
4
Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
5
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
6
Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, University of Crete, Crete, Greece.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Private Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.
8
INSERM U995, University Lille Nord de France, Lille, France; CIC-PT-1403-INSERM-CH&U, University Hospital, Lille, France.
9
Inmunonutrition Research Group, Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Instituto del Frío, Institute of Food Science and Technology an Nutrition (ICTAN), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Madrid, Spain.
10
ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport-INEF, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Institut für Ernährungs- und Lebensmittelwissenschaften - Ernährungphysiologie, Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms Universität, Bonn, Germany.
11
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; University College Ghent Vesalius, Ghent, Belgium.
12
Agricultural Research Council, Research Centre for Food and Nutrition (CRA-NUT), Rome, Italy.
13
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health through physical activity" Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
14
Department of Physical Education, School of Education, University of Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
15
Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
16
Youth/Child and cARdiovascular Risk and Environmental (YCARE) Research Group, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
17
Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, School of Health Science (EUCS), University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo, Department of Preventive Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE:

Increased physical activity (PA) and decreased sedentary behaviors (SBs) may have beneficial effects on cardio-metabolic risk in adolescents. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between independent/combined effects of PA and SB with individual/clustered cardio-metabolic risk factors.

METHODS:

A sample of 769 adolescents (12.5-17.5 years) from the HELENA cross-sectional study (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) and with valid data on metabolic risk factors were included.

RESULTS:

Concerning moderate-to-vigorous-PA (MVPA) and vigorous-PA (VPA), measured with accelerometers, girls tended to do more MVPA (36%) and VPA (114%) than boys. Unadjusted analyses show a positive association between "PA ≥ 60 min/d; SB ≥ 2 h" and the ratio TC/HDL-c (β = 0.27; 95%CI 0.01 to 0.52; p < 0.05), and a negative association between "MVPA ≥ 60 min/d; SB < 2h" with the ∑ 4Skinfolds (β = -0.32; 95%CI -0.61 to -0.02; p<0.05). Moreover, "SB ≥ 2 h/d" was associated with increased cardio-metabolic risk (PR 1.59; 95%CI 1.05 to 2.39; p < 0.05), while "PA ≥ 60 min/d; SB < 2h" had a protective effect against cardio-metabolic risk (PR 0.48; 95%CI 0.25 to 0.91; p < 0.05). After adjustment for potential confounders, a positive association between SB and ∑ 4Skinfolds was shown (β = 0.28; 95%CI 0.04 to 0.53; p < 0.05). Furthermore, VO2max (mL/kg/min) tends to increase in those participants who do higher VPA and less SB (p = 0.042), and there was a protective effect of "VPA ≥ 30 min/d; SB < 2h" against cardio-metabolic risk (PR 0.24; 95%CI 0.07 to 0.85; p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The current study suggests that adolescents should be encouraged to decrease sedentary lifestyle and increase physical activity, especially vigorous physical activity, in order to reduce cardio-metabolic risk.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Cardiometabolic risk; Physical activity; Sedentary lifestyle

PMID:
25828110
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.03.176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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