Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vet Ophthalmol. 2016 Mar;19(2):138-43. doi: 10.1111/vop.12273. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

Third eyelid gland neoplasms of dogs and cats: a retrospective histopathologic study of 145 cases.

Author information

1
From Eye Care for Animals, 12419 Metric Blvd, Austin, TX, 78758, USA.
2
Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2015 Linden Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, USA.
3
Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2015 Linden Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe the various types of primary neoplasms affecting the third eyelid (TEL) gland of dogs and cats.

METHODS:

A retrospective search of the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) database was performed. Veterinary ophthalmologists, primary care veterinarians, and, when appropriate, owners were contacted for patient follow-up information. Patient data points collected included species, age, sex, breed, laterality, tumor type, surgical margins, recurrence, metastasis, and length of follow-up.

RESULTS:

A total of 127 canine and 18 feline cases met the inclusion criteria. The most common canine TEL gland tumor was adenocarcinoma (n = 108; 85.0%) followed by adenoma (n = 18; 14.2%) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (n = 1; 0.8%). For canine cases with follow-up information available (n = 62), 8.1% had confirmed or suspected metastasis and 11.3% had confirmed or suspected local recurrence of disease. The most common feline TEL gland tumor was adenocarcinoma (n = 15; 83.3%) followed by SCC (n = 3; 16.7%). For feline cases with follow-up information available (n = 9), 40.0% had confirmed or suspected metastasis and 30.0% had confirmed or suspected local recurrence of disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study determined that adenocarcinoma was the most common third eyelid gland tumor in both dogs and cats. The overall survival times were less, and metastatic occurrence and recurrence rates appeared to be higher for feline tumors as compared to those diagnosed in dogs. This is the first report of SCC originating from glandular ductular epithelium.

KEYWORDS:

adenocarcinoma; adenoma; canine; feline; squamous cell carcinoma; third eyelid gland

PMID:
25827973
DOI:
10.1111/vop.12273
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center