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Gait Posture. 2015 May;41(4):957-9. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.03.002. Epub 2015 Mar 12.

Kinematic and kinetic comparison of barefoot and shod running in mid/forefoot and rearfoot strike runners.

Author information

1
Neuroscience Program, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401, Moscow, ID 83844-2401, United States. Electronic address: mathompson@fortlewis.edu.
2
Department of Statistics, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter Drive MS 1104, Moscow, ID 83844-1104, United States. Electronic address: stevel@uidaho.edu.
3
Department of Movement Sciences, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401, Moscow, ID 83844-2401, United States; WWAMI Medical Education Program, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter Drive MS 4207, Moscow, ID 83844-4207, United States. Electronic address: jeffreys@uidaho.edu.
4
WWAMI Medical Education Program, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter Drive MS 4207, Moscow, ID 83844-4207, United States; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter Drive MS 3051, Moscow, ID 83844-3051, United States. Electronic address: cpmcgowan@uidaho.edu.

Abstract

Barefoot running has been associated with decreased stride length and switching from a rearfoot strike (RFS) pattern to a mid/forefoot strike (M/FFS) pattern. However, some individuals naturally contact the ground on their mid/forefoot, even when wearing cushioned running shoes. The purpose of this study was to determine if the mechanics of barefoot running by natural shod RFS runners differed from natural shod M/FFS runners. Twenty habitually shod runners (ten natural M/FFS and ten natural RFS) participated in this study. Three-dimensional motion analysis and ground reaction force data were captured as subjects ran at their preferred running speed in both barefoot and shod conditions. M/FFS experienced only a decrease in stride length when switching from shod to barefoot running. Whereas, when switching from shod to barefoot running, RFS individuals experienced a decrease in stride length, switched to a plantarflexed position at ground contact and saw reduced impact peak magnitudes. These results suggest that when barefoot, the RFS group ran similar to the M/FFS group running barefoot or shod.

KEYWORDS:

Barefoot; Biomechanics; Foot strike; Locomotion; Running

PMID:
25827681
DOI:
10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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