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Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2015 Jun;33:192-7. doi: 10.1016/j.copbio.2015.03.007. Epub 2015 Mar 29.

Corrosion and odor management in sewer systems.

Author information

1
Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia.
2
Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia; CRC for Water Sensitive Cities, PO Box 8000, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.
3
Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia; CRC for Water Sensitive Cities, PO Box 8000, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia. Electronic address: zhiguo@awmc.uq.edu.au.

Abstract

Sewers emit hydrogen sulfide and various volatile organic sulfur and carbon compounds, which require control and mitigation. In the last 5-10 years, extensive research was conducted to optimize existing sulfide abatement technologies based on newly developed in-depth understanding of the in-sewer processes. Recent advances have also led to low-cost novel solutions targeting sewer biofilms. Online control has been demonstrated to greatly reduce the chemical usage. Dynamic models for both the water, air and solid (concrete) phases have been developed and used for the planning and maintenance of sewer systems. Existing technologies primarily focused on 'hotspots' in sewers. Future research should aim to achieve network-wide corrosion and emission control and management of sewers as an integrated component of an urban water system.

PMID:
25827114
DOI:
10.1016/j.copbio.2015.03.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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