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Nat Commun. 2015 Mar 31;6:6740. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7740.

Genomic signatures of human and animal disease in the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK.
2
Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.
3
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00100, Finland.
4
MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, London W2 1PG, UK.
5
Department of Computer Science, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00100, Finland.
6
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.
7
Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Quan 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
8
Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Quan 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
9
1] Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Quan 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam [2] Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LJ, UK.
10
Department of Global Health-Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1100 DE, The Netherlands.
11
Section of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London W2 1PG, UK.
12
The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Campus, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK.
13
Faculty of Infectious &Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene &Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK.
14
1] Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Quan 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam [2] Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LJ, UK [3] Faculty of Infectious &Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene &Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

Abstract

Streptococcus suis causes disease in pigs worldwide and is increasingly implicated in zoonotic disease in East and South-East Asia. To understand the genetic basis of disease in S. suis, we study the genomes of 375 isolates with detailed clinical phenotypes from pigs and humans from the United Kingdom and Vietnam. Here, we show that isolates associated with disease contain substantially fewer genes than non-clinical isolates, but are more likely to encode virulence factors. Human disease isolates are limited to a single-virulent population, originating in the 1920, s when pig production was intensified, but no consistent genomic differences between pig and human isolates are observed. There is little geographical clustering of different S. suis subpopulations, and the bacterium undergoes high rates of recombination, implying that an increase in virulence anywhere in the world could have a global impact over a short timescale.

PMID:
25824154
PMCID:
PMC4389249
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms7740
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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