Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Feline Med Surg. 2016 Feb;18(2):150-9. doi: 10.1177/1098612X15575778. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Influence of music and its genres on respiratory rate and pupil diameter variations in cats under general anaesthesia: contribution to promoting patient safety.

Author information

  • 1Anjos of Assis Veterinary Medicine Center (CMVAA), Barreiro, Portugal.
  • 2Anjos of Assis Veterinary Medicine Center (CMVAA), Barreiro, Portugal Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal Interdisciplinary Centre of Research in Animal Health (CIISA), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Lisbon, Portugal miguelcarreira@fmv.ulisboa.pt.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aims of the study were to recognise if there is any auditory sensory stimuli processing in cats under general anaesthesia, and to evaluate changes in respiratory rate (RR) and pupillary diameter (PD) in anaesthetised patients exposed to different music genres, while relating this to the depth of anaesthesia.

METHODS:

A sample of 12 cats submitted for elective ovariohysterectomy was exposed to 2 min excerpts of three different music genres (classical [CM], pop [PM] and heavy metal [HM]) at three points during surgery (T1 = coeliotomy; T2 = ligature placement and transection of the ovarian pedicle; T3 = ligature placement and transection of the uterine body). A multiparametric medical monitor was used to measure the RR, and a digital calliper was used for PD measurement. Music was delivered through headphones, which fully covered the patient's ears. P values   <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.   

RESULTS:

Statistically significant differences between stimuli conditions for all surgical points were obtained for RR (T1, P = 0.03; T2, P = 0.00; T3, P = 0.00) and for PD (T1, P = 0.03; T2, P = 0.04; T3, P = 0.00). Most individuals exhibited lower values for RR and PD when exposed to CM, intermediate values to PM and higher values to HM.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

The results suggest that cats under general anaesthesia are likely to perform auditory sensory stimuli processing. The exposure to music induces RR and PD variations modulated by the genre of music and is associated with autonomic nervous system activity. The use of music in the surgical theatre may contribute to allowing a reduced anaesthetic dose, minimising undesirable side effects and thus promoting patient safety.

PMID:
25824137
DOI:
10.1177/1098612X15575778
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center