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Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2015 Jul;19(4):435-45. doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2015.02.008. Epub 2015 Mar 5.

Efficacy and safety of perampanel in adolescent patients with drug-resistant partial seizures in three double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III randomized clinical studies and a combined extension study.

Author information

1
Comprehensive Epilepsy Care Center for Children and Adults, St Louis, MO, USA. Electronic address: werosenfeld@msn.com.
2
Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: jconry@childrensnational.org.
3
University Hospitals KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: lieven.lagae@uzleuven.be.
4
Children's Clinical University Hospital, Riga, Latvia. Electronic address: dr.rozentals@inbox.lv.
5
Eisai Neuroscience Product Creation Unit, Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA. Electronic address: Haichen_Yang@eisai.com.
6
Eisai Medical and Scientific Affairs, Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA. Electronic address: Randi_Fain@eisai.com.
7
Eisai Medical and Scientific Affairs, Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA. Electronic address: Betsy_Williams@eisai.com.
8
Eisai Neuroscience Product Creation Unit, Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA. Electronic address: Dinesh_Kumar@eisai.com.
9
Formerly Eisai Inc., Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA. Electronic address: vgo329@yahoo.com.
10
Eisai Neuroscience Product Creation Unit, Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA. Electronic address: Antonio_Laurenza@eisai.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Assess perampanel's efficacy and safety as adjunctive therapy in adolescents (ages 12-17) with drug-resistant partial seizures.

METHODS:

Adolescent patients enrolled in multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III core studies (studies 304, 305, or 306) completed 19-week, double-blind phase (6-week titration/13-week maintenance) with once-daily perampanel or placebo. Upon completion, patients were eligible for the extension (study 307), beginning with 16-week, blinded conversion, during which placebo patients switched to perampanel. Patients then entered the open-label treatment.

RESULTS:

Of 1480 patients from the core studies, 143 were adolescents. Pooled adolescent data from these core studies demonstrated median percent decreases in seizure frequency for perampanel 8 mg (34.8%) and 12 mg (35.6%) were approximately twice that of placebo (18.0%). Responder rates increased with perampanel 8 mg (40.9%) and 12 mg (45.0%) versus placebo (22.2%). Adolescents receiving concomitant enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) had smaller reductions in seizure frequency (8 mg:31.6%; 12 mg:26.8%) than those taking non-inducing AEDs (8 mg:54.6%; 12 mg:52.7%). Relative to pre-perampanel baseline, seizure frequency and responder rates during the extension (Weeks 1-52) improved with perampanel. Most commonly reported adverse events in adolescents during the core studies were dizziness (20.4%), somnolence (15.3%), aggression (8.2%), decreased appetite (6.1%), and rhinitis (5.1%). Dizziness (13.2%), somnolence (11.6%), and aggression (6.6%) most often led to perampanel interruption/dose adjustment during the extension.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Data demonstrated adjunctive perampanel treatment in adolescents with drug-resistant partial seizures produced better seizure control versus placebo, sustained seizure frequency improvements, and a generally favorable safety profile. Results were comparable to the overall study population.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION:

clinicaltrials.gov Identifiers: Study 304: NCT00699972; 305: NCT00699582; 306: NCT00700310; Study 307: NCT00735397.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Antiepileptic drugs; Epilepsy; Perampanel; Post hoc analysis

PMID:
25823975
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejpn.2015.02.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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