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J Innate Immun. 2015;7(6):557-62. doi: 10.1159/000375494. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Generation of Natural Killer Cell Memory during Viral Infection.

Author information

1
Immunology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, N.Y., USA.

Abstract

Immunological memory is classically regarded as an attribute of antigen-specific T and B lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system. Cells of the innate immune system, including natural killer (NK) cells, have been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens in an antigen-independent manner and then die off. However, NK cells have recently been described to possess traits of adaptive immunity, such as clonal expansion after viral antigen exposure to generate long-lived memory cells. In this review, we will discuss the current evidence for viral-induced NK cell memory in both mice and humans.

PMID:
25823611
PMCID:
PMC4581887
DOI:
10.1159/000375494
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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