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Bone Marrow Transplant. 2015 Aug;50(8):1013-23. doi: 10.1038/bmt.2015.63. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Author information

1
Division of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Pediatric Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
3
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.
4
Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.
5
Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
6
Department of Hematology Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, The Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, MO, USA.
7
Section of Hematology Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, AZ, USA.
8
1] Japanese Data Center for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Nagoya, Japan [2] Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
9
Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
10
Department of Hematology, Oncology and Internal Diseases, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
11
Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
12
Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
13
Colorado Blood Cancer Institute at Presbyterian/St Luke's Medical Center, Denver, CO, USA.
14
Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
15
Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA.
16
Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA.
17
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
18
Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
19
Department of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
20
Seidman Cancer Center, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.
21
Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
22
Unit of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy.
23
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Boston Children's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
24
Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
25
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
26
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worchester, MA, USA.
27
Imperial College, London, UK.
28
University Hospital of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
29
Department of Internal Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
30
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
31
Royal Adelaide Hospital/SA Pathology and School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients.

PMID:
25822223
PMCID:
PMC4989866
DOI:
10.1038/bmt.2015.63
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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