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Sleep Med. 2015 May;16(5):631-6. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2014.10.024. Epub 2015 Feb 7.

Diagnostic accuracy of the Spanish version of the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire for screening of obstructive sleep apnea in habitually snoring children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Pulmonology, Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
2
Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Pulmonology, Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Sleep Medicine Center, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
3
Sleep Medicine Center, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
4
Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Pulmonology, Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Sleep Medicine Center, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address: pbrockmann@med.puc.cl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We aimed to determine the diagnostic test accuracy of the Spanish version of the respiratory symptoms scale of the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) in habitually snoring children for identifying obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

METHODS:

Habitually snoring children referred for polysomnography (PSG) were recruited. Parents answered the PSQ prior to PSG. Based on an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >1.0 in PSG, children were divided into OSA and primary snorers. Correlations to PSG indices and diagnostic test accuracy measures were calculated.

RESULTS:

Of the 83 (n = 53 males, mean age 9.5 ± 3.6 years) habitually snoring children included, 35 had OSA. The previously validated PSQ cutoff value of 0.33 showed a specificity of 0.72 and sensitivity of 0.78. The PSQ score correlated significantly with the AHI rs = 0.313 (p-value = 0.004). Six items of the PSQ were significantly different between cases and controls. A subscale constructed on these six PSQ items concerning respiratory symptoms showed a good sensitivity (0.886) and an excellent negative likelihood ratio (0.261). PSQ was able to identify 89% of the children with OSA correctly.

CONCLUSIONS:

This version of the PSQ was able to identify children with OSA, separating them from those with primary snoring. The use of this simple, standardized questionnaire tool seems to be helpful and may improve clinical decision making in habitually snoring children.

KEYWORDS:

Accuracy; Apnea; Diagnostic; Polysomnography; Questionnaire; Snoring

PMID:
25819419
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleep.2014.10.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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