Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatry Res. 2015 May 30;232(2):145-53. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2015.03.001. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

A splitting brain: Imbalanced neural networks in schizophrenia.

Author information

1
The Mental Health Center and the Psychiatric Laboratory, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China; State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China.
2
Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Health Care, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Health Care, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA; Center for Comparative Neuroimaging (CCNI), Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester MA, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Health Care, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA; Center for Comparative Neuroimaging (CCNI), Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester MA, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Huck Institute of Life Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, W-341 Millennium Science Complex, University Park, PA 16802, USA. Electronic address: nxzbio@engr.psu.edu.
6
The Mental Health Center and the Psychiatric Laboratory, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China; State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China. Electronic address: xuntao26@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Dysconnectivity between key brain systems has been hypothesized to underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The present study examined the pattern of functional dysconnectivity across whole-brain neural networks in 121 first-episode, treatment-naïve patients with schizophrenia by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). Group independent component analysis (ICA) was first applied to rsfMRI data to extract 90 functional components of the brain. The functional connectivity between these ICA components was then evaluated and compared between the patient and control groups. To examine the functional roles of significantly altered between-component connections in patients, each ICA component was ascribed to one of 10 previously well-defined brain networks/areas. Relative to findings in healthy controls (n=103), 29 altered functional connections including 19 connections with increased connectivity and 10 connections with decreased connectivity in schizophrenia patients were found. Increased connectivity was mainly within the default mode network (DMN) and between the DMN and cognitive networks, whereas decreased connectivity was predominantly associated with sensory networks. Given the key roles of the DMN in internal mental processes and sensory networks in inputs from the external environment, these patterns of altered brain network connectivity could suggest imbalanced neural processing of internal and external information in schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS:

Functional connectivity; Neural networks; Resting state; Schizophrenia; fMRI

PMID:
25819347
PMCID:
PMC4704446
DOI:
10.1016/j.pscychresns.2015.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center