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Vision Res. 2015 Oct;115(Pt A):17-22. doi: 10.1016/j.visres.2015.03.011. Epub 2015 Mar 26.

Can a single short-term mechanism account for priming of pop-out?

Author information

1
Cognitive Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: w.kruijne@vu.nl.
2
Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands.
3
Psychology, University of Iceland, Gimli, Sæmundargata, IS-101 Reykjavík, Iceland.
4
Cognitive Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Trial-to-trial feature repetition speeds response times in pop-out visual search tasks. These priming effects are often ascribed to a short-term memory system. Recently, however, it has been reported that a 'build-up' sequence of repetitions could facilitate responses over 16 trials later - well beyond twice the typically reported time course (Vision Research, 2011, 51, 1972-1978). Here, we first report two replication attempts that yielded little to no support for such long-term priming of pop-out. The results instead fell in line with the predictions of a previously proposed computational model that describes priming as short-lived facilitation that decays over approximately eight trials (Vision Research, 2010, 50, 2110-2115). In the second part of this study, we show that these data are consistent with a simple formulation of decay with a single timescale, and that there is no significant priming beyond eight trials.

KEYWORDS:

Attention; Implicit memory; Kernel analysis; Priming of pop-out; Visual search

PMID:
25818904
DOI:
10.1016/j.visres.2015.03.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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