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J Vet Intern Med. 2015 Mar-Apr;29(2):589-96. doi: 10.1111/jvim.12565.

Longitudinal evaluation of serum pancreatic enzymes and ultrasonographic findings in diabetic cats without clinically relevant pancreatitis at diagnosis.

Author information

1
Clinic for Small Animal Internal Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; Department of Animal Medicine, Production and Health, University of Padova, Legnaro, PD, Italy; Istituto Veterinario di Novara, Granozzo con Monticello, NO, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cats with diabetes mellitus can have subclinical pancreatitis but prospective studies to confirm this are lacking. Metabolic control of diabetic cats with pancreatitis is difficult.

HYPOTHESIS:

Subclinical pancreatitis occurs in diabetic cats at the time diabetes is diagnosed or might develop during the follow-up period, hampering diabetic remission.

ANIMALS:

Thirty cats with newly diagnosed diabetes without clinical signs of pancreatitis on admission.

METHODS:

Prospective study. On admission and 2 and 6 months later, serum Spec fPL and DGGR-lipase were measured and the pancreas underwent ultrasonographic examination. Pancreatitis was suspected if serum markers were increased or ≥2 ultrasonographic abnormalities were detected. Cats were treated with insulin glargine and diabetic remission was defined as euglycemia ≥4 weeks after discontinuation of insulin. Nonparametric statistical tests were used for analysis.

RESULTS:

Subclinical pancreatitis at the time of diagnosis was suspected in 33, 50, and 31% of cats based on Spec fPL, DGGR-lipase and ultrasonography, respectively; and in 60% when diagnostic criteria were combined. During the follow-up period, suspected pancreatitis developed in additional 17-30% cats. Only 1 cat had transient clinical signs compatible with pancreatitis. Seventeen of the 30 cats (57%) achieved remission. Frequency of abnormal Spec fPL and DGGR-lipase and abnormal ultrasonographic findings did not differ in cats achieving remission and those who did not. Cats achieving remission had significantly lower Spec fPL at 2 months (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

Based on laboratory and ultrasonographic measurements, many cats with diabetes might have pancreatitis, although without clinical signs. Cats with high Spec fPL might have a reduced chance of diabetic remission; however, this topic needs further studies in large cohorts of diabetic cats.

KEYWORDS:

DGGR-lipase; Endocrinology; Feline; Gastroenterology; Spec fPL

PMID:
25818213
PMCID:
PMC4895493
DOI:
10.1111/jvim.12565
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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