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Public Health. 2015 Jul;129(7):881-8. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2015.02.021. Epub 2015 Mar 25.

Social disparities in access to breast and cervical cancer screening by women living in Spain.

Author information

1
Preventive Medicine and Public Health Teaching and Research Unit, Health Sciences Faculty, Rey Juan Carlos University, Alcórcon, Spain.
2
Preventive Medicine and Public Health Teaching and Research Unit, Health Sciences Faculty, Rey Juan Carlos University, Alcórcon, Spain. Electronic address: rodrigo.jimenez@urjc.es.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe uptake of breast and cervical cancer screening by women living in Spain, analyse the possible associated social and health factors, and compare uptake rates with those obtained in previous surveys.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study using data from the 2011 Spanish national health survey.

METHODS:

Uptake of breast cancer screening was analysed by asking women aged 40-69 years whether they had undergone mammography in the previous two years. Uptake of cervical cancer screening was analysed by asking women aged 25-65 years whether they had undergone cervical cytology in the previous three years. Independent variables included sociodemographic characteristics, and variables related to health status and lifestyle.

RESULTS:

Seventy-two percent of women had undergone mammography in the previous two years. Having private health insurance increased the probability of breast screening uptake four-fold [odds ratio (OR) 3.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.71-5.79], and being an immigrant was a negative predictor for breast screening uptake. Seventy percent of women had undergone cervical cytology in the previous three years. Higher-educated women were more likely to have undergone cervical cancer screening (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.97-3.40), and obese women and women living in rural areas were less likely to have undergone cervical cancer screening. There have been no relevant improvements in uptake rates of either breast or cervical cancer screening since 2006.

CONCLUSION:

Uptake of breast and cervical cancer screening could be improved in Spain, and uptake rates have stagnated over recent years. Social disparities have been detected with regard to access to these screening tests, indicating that it is necessary to continue researching and optimizing prevention programmes in order to improve uptake and reduce these disparities.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; Cervical cancer; Disparities; Screening; Secondary prevention

PMID:
25818014
DOI:
10.1016/j.puhe.2015.02.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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