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Ann Emerg Med. 2015 Sep;66(3):222-229.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.03.004. Epub 2015 Mar 26.

Intravenous Subdissociative-Dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Analgesia in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY. Electronic address: smotov@maimonidesmed.org.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.
3
Department of Pharmacy, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; Long Island University School of Pharmacy, Brooklyn, NY.
4
Department of Pharmacy, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.
5
Office of Research Administration, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

We assess and compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of subdissociative intravenous-dose ketamine with morphine in emergency department (ED) patients.

METHODS:

This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial evaluating ED patients aged 18 to 55 years and experiencing moderate to severe acute abdominal, flank, or musculoskeletal pain, defined as a numeric rating scale score greater than or equal to 5. Patients were randomized to receive ketamine at 0.3 mg/kg or morphine at 0.1 mg/kg by intravenous push during 3 to 5 minutes. Evaluations occurred at 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Primary outcome was reduction in pain at 30 minutes. Secondary outcome was the incidence of rescue analgesia at 30 and 60 minutes.

RESULTS:

Forty-five patients per group were enrolled in the study. The primary change in mean pain scores was not significantly different in the ketamine and morphine groups: 8.6 versus 8.5 at baseline (mean difference 0.1; 95% confidence interval -0.46 to 0.77) and 4.1 versus 3.9 at 30 minutes (mean difference 0.2; 95% confidence interval -1.19 to 1.46; P=.97). There was no difference in the incidence of rescue fentanyl analgesia at 30 or 60 minutes. No statistically significant or clinically concerning changes in vital signs were observed. No serious adverse events occurred in either group. Patients in the ketamine group reported increased minor adverse effects at 15 minutes post-drug administration.

CONCLUSION:

Subdissociative intravenous ketamine administered at 0.3 mg/kg provides analgesic effectiveness and apparent safety comparable to that of intravenous morphine for short-term treatment of acute pain in the ED.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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