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Cell. 2015 Mar 26;161(1):56-66. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.03.019.

Meeting the global food demand of the future by engineering crop photosynthesis and yield potential.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Electronic address: slong@illinois.edu.
2
Department of Plant Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
3
CAS Key Laboratory for Computational Biology, CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology, Shanghai 200031, PRC; State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, Changsha, Hunan 410125, PRC.

Abstract

Increase in demand for our primary foodstuffs is outstripping increase in yields, an expanding gap that indicates large potential food shortages by mid-century. This comes at a time when yield improvements are slowing or stagnating as the approaches of the Green Revolution reach their biological limits. Photosynthesis, which has been improved little in crops and falls far short of its biological limit, emerges as the key remaining route to increase the genetic yield potential of our major crops. Thus, there is a timely need to accelerate our understanding of the photosynthetic process in crops to allow informed and guided improvements via in-silico-assisted genetic engineering. Potential and emerging approaches to improving crop photosynthetic efficiency are discussed, and the new tools needed to realize these changes are presented.

PMID:
25815985
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.03.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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