Format

Send to

Choose Destination
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2015;16(5):334-50. doi: 10.3109/15622975.2015.1014410. Epub 2015 Mar 27.

Major depression and electrovestibulography.

Author information

1
Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Monash University Central Clinical School and the Alfred Hospital , Melbourne, Victoria Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

No electrophysiological neuroimaging or genetic markers have been established that strongly relate to a diagnosis of major depression or its severity. The objective of this paper is to describe the preliminary evaluation of a potential new biomarker for depression utilizing the recording of electrical activity from the outer ear canal referred to as electrovestibulography (EVestG).

METHODS:

Sensory oto-acoustic features were extracted from EVestG data to compare 31 healthy age- and gender-matched individuals as controls to 43 major depressive disorder (MDD) subjects (22 symptomatic (MDD-S), 21 reduced symptomatic (MDD-R)). The stimulus was a single supine-vertical translation. The six features examined were based on the measured firing pattern interval histogram and the shape of the average field potential response.

RESULTS:

An unbiased classification accuracy of 85, 87 and 77% was achieved for separating Control from MDD-S, Control from MDD, and MDD-S from MDD-R groups respectively. Features used showed low but significant correlations (P < 0.05) with MADRS and CORE assessments.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results support the use of separate features for measuring MDD symptomatology versus diagnosing MDD, representing plausible different mechanisms of brain function in MDD-S and MDD-R. The first evidence of the successful application of sensory oto-acoustic features toward diagnosing and measuring the symptomatology of MDD is presented.

KEYWORDS:

biological markers; depression; humans; major depressive disorder; neurobiology

PMID:
25815564
DOI:
10.3109/15622975.2015.1014410
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center