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World J Psychiatry. 2015 Mar 22;5(1):68-78. doi: 10.5498/wjp.v5.i1.68.

Effects of music and music therapy on mood in neurological patients.

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1
Alfredo Raglio, Lapo Attardo, Giulia Gontero, Silvia Rollino, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy.

Abstract

Mood disorder and depressive syndromes represent a common comorbid condition in neurological disorders with a prevalence rate that ranges between 20% and 50% of patients with stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Notwithstanding, these conditions are often under-diagnosed and under-treated in the clinical practice and negatively affect the functional recovery, the adherence to treatment, the quality of life, and even the mortality risk. In addition, a bidirectional association between depression and neurological disorders may be possible being that depressive syndromes may be considered as a risk factor for certain neurological diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence regarding the effects of music therapy (MT) and other musical interventions on different aspects of neurological disorders, no updated article reviewing outcomes such as mood, emotions, depression, activity of daily living and so on is actually available; for this reason, little is known about the effectiveness of music and MT on these important outcomes in neurological patients. The aim of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current literature on musical interventions and their effects on mood and depression in patients with neurological disorders. Searching on PubMed and PsycInfo databases, 25 studies corresponding to the inclusion criteria have been selected; 11 of them assess the effects of music or MT in Dementia, 9 explore the efficacy on patients with Stroke, and 5 regard other neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/motor neuron disease, Chronic quadriplegia, Parkinson's Disease, and Acquired Brain dysfunctions. Selected studies are based on relational and rehabilitative music therapy approaches or concern music listening interventions. Most of the studies support the efficacy of MT and other musical interventions on mood, depressive syndromes, and quality of life on neurological patients.

KEYWORDS:

Acquired brain injury; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Depression; Epilepsy; Listening; Mood; Multiple sclerosis; Music; Music therapy; Narrative review; Neurological disease; Neurological disorders; Parkinson; Stroke

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