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Mutat Res Genet Toxicol Environ Mutagen. 2015 Feb;779:1-4. doi: 10.1016/j.mrgentox.2015.01.009. Epub 2015 Jan 29.

Continuous cytogenetic follow-up, over 5 years, of three individuals accidentally irradiated by a cobalt-60 source.

Author information

1
Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Beijing 100850, China.
2
China CDC Key Laboratory of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Emergency, National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100088, China.
3
Affiliated Hospital of China Institute for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan, Shanxi Province 030006, China.
4
China CDC Key Laboratory of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Emergency, National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100088, China. Electronic address: qjliu@nirp.cn.
5
Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Beijing 100850, China. Electronic address: yingchen_29@163.com.

Abstract

A cobalt-60 irradiation accident occurred in Shanxi, China, on April 11, 2008. Five people were exposed to total-body irradiation ranging from 1.7 to 14.5 Gy. Two victims died post-irradiation, due to acute intestinal radiation sickness (at 62 days) and tuberculosis (at 1.5 year). The other three victims received medical follow-ups and were monitored for 5 years with multiple cytogenetic analyses. Unstable chromosome aberrations, including dicentric and centric rings (dic+r) and the micronucleus frequency in binucleated lymphocytes, were monitored. In addition, G-banding karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods were used to analyze translocations, for exploring chromosome stability and for retrospective dosimetry. The results show that unstable chromosome aberrations (dic+r) declined each year, dropping to about 20-40% of initial levels by the 5th year. A similar trend was observed for the micronucleus frequency. Our results show that the translocation frequencies of the three victims, detected by G-banding karyotype, remained stable for the 5 years. Five years after irradiation, the translocation rates of the three victims (G-banding and FISH analyses) were similar. The retrospective estimated doses, reconstructed based on the translocation frequencies, were consistent with the biological doses estimated at the first day post-irradiation using dic+r. The results of this study indicate that chromosome translocation frequencies can be used as a biological dosimeter and are an excellent index for dose reconstruction.

KEYWORDS:

Biological dose; Chromosomal aberration; Dose reconstruction; Follow-up observation; Radiation accident

PMID:
25813720
DOI:
10.1016/j.mrgentox.2015.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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