Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Chest. 2015 Jul;148(1):128-137. doi: 10.1378/chest.14-1466.

An Internet-Mediated Pedometer-Based Program Improves Health-Related Quality-of-Life Domains and Daily Step Counts in COPD: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, and the Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Section, VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
2
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI.
3
Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI.
4
VA Center for Clinical Management Research, Health Services Research and Development Center of Innovation, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI.
5
VA Center for Clinical Management Research, Health Services Research and Development Center of Innovation, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI; University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI.
6
Department of Research and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena, CA.
7
VA New York Harbor, Brooklyn, NY.
8
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
9
VA Center for Clinical Management Research, Health Services Research and Development Center of Innovation, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI; Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Electronic address: caroli@umich.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low levels of physical activity (PA) are associated with poor outcomes in people with COPD. Interventions to increase PA could improve outcomes.

METHODS:

We tested the efficacy of a novel Internet-mediated, pedometer-based exercise intervention. Veterans with COPD (N = 239) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to the (1) intervention group (Omron HJ-720 ITC pedometer and Internet-mediated program) or (2) wait-list control group (pedometer). The primary outcome was health-related quality of life (HRQL), assessed by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), at 4 months. We examined the SGRQ total score (SGRQ-TS) and three domain scores: Symptoms, Activities, and Impact. The secondary outcome was daily step counts. Linear regression models assessed the effect of intervention on outcomes.

RESULTS:

Participants had a mean age of 67 ± 9 years, and 94% were men. There was no significant between-group difference in mean 4-month SGRQ-TS (2.3 units, P = .14). Nevertheless, a significantly greater proportion of intervention participants than control subjects had at least a 4-unit improvement in SGRQ-TS, the minimum clinically important difference (53% vs 39%, respectively, P = .05). For domain scores, the intervention group had a lower (reflecting better HRQL) mean than the control group by 4.6 units for Symptoms (P = .046) and by 3.3 units for Impact (P = .049). There was no significant difference in Activities score between the two groups. Compared with the control subjects, intervention participants walked 779 more steps per day at 4 months (P = .005).

CONCLUSIONS:

An Internet-mediated, pedometer-based walking program can improve domains of HRQL and daily step counts at 4 months in people with COPD.

TRIAL REGISTRY:

Clinical Trials.gov; No.: NCT01102777; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

PMID:
25811395
PMCID:
PMC4493869
DOI:
10.1378/chest.14-1466
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center