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Cancer. 2015 Jul 1;121(13):2244-52. doi: 10.1002/cncr.29329. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Dietary intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and survival after breast cancer: A population-based follow-up study on Long Island, New York.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
2
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.
5
Department of Environmental Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.
6
Department of Population Health, New York University, New York, New York.
7
Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University, New York, New York.
8
Department of Health Studies and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
9
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, New York.
10
Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York.
11
Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In laboratory experiments, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been found to reduce inflammatory eicosanoids resulting from ω-6 PUFA metabolism via competitive inhibition, and the ω-3-induced cytotoxic environment increases apoptosis and reduces cell growth in breast cancer cells. To the authors' knowledge, epidemiologic investigations regarding whether dietary ω-3 PUFA intake benefits survival after breast cancer are limited and inconsistent.

METHODS:

The authors used resources from a population-based follow-up study conducted on Long Island, New York, among 1463 women newly diagnosed with first primary breast cancer who were interviewed an average of approximately 3 months after diagnosis to assess risk and prognostic factors, including dietary intake (using a food frequency questionnaire). Vital status was determined through 2011, yielding a median follow-up of 14.7 years and 485 deaths. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression.

RESULTS:

All-cause mortality was reduced among women with breast cancer reporting the highest quartile of intake (compared with never) for tuna (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92), other baked/broiled fish (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97), and the dietary long-chain ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92) and eicosapentaenoic acid (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97).

CONCLUSIONS:

All-cause mortality was reduced by 16% to 34% among women with breast cancer who reported a high intake of fish and long-chain ω-3 PUFAs. Long-chain ω-3 PUFA intake from fish and other dietary sources may provide a potential strategy to improve survival after breast cancer.

KEYWORDS:

all-cause mortality; breast cancer; polyunsaturated fatty acids PUFAs; survival

PMID:
25809414
PMCID:
PMC4581907
DOI:
10.1002/cncr.29329
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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