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Nat Commun. 2015 Mar 25;6:6600. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7600.

Multi-spectral fluorescent reporter influenza viruses (Color-flu) as powerful tools for in vivo studies.

Author information

1
1] Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology Infection-Induced Host Responses Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan [2] Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan.
2
Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan.
3
1] Laboratory of Animal Hygiene, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan [2] Transboundary Animal Distance Center, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan.
4
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53711, USA.
5
1] Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology Infection-Induced Host Responses Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan [2] Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.
6
1] Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology Infection-Induced Host Responses Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan [2] The Systems Biology Institute, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0071, Japan [3] Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0022, Japan [4] Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495, Japan.
7
1] Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology Infection-Induced Host Responses Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan [2] Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan [3] Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53711, USA [4] Department of Special Pathogens, International Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan.

Abstract

Seasonal influenza A viruses cause annual epidemics of respiratory disease; highly pathogenic avian H5N1 and the recently emerged H7N9 viruses cause severe infections in humans, often with fatal outcomes. Although numerous studies have addressed the pathogenicity of influenza viruses, influenza pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here we generate influenza viruses expressing fluorescent proteins of different colours ('Color-flu' viruses) to facilitate the study of viral infection in in vivo models. On adaptation to mice, stable expression of the fluorescent proteins in infected animals allows their detection by different types of microscopy and by flow cytometry. We use this system to analyse the progression of viral spread in mouse lungs, for live imaging of virus-infected cells, and for differential gene expression studies in virus antigen-positive and virus antigen-negative live cells in the lungs of Color-flu-infected mice. Collectively, Color-flu viruses are powerful tools to analyse virus infections at the cellular level in vivo to better understand influenza pathogenesis.

PMID:
25807527
PMCID:
PMC4389232
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms7600
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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