Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2015 Mar 25;6:6505. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7505.

Subsistence strategies in traditional societies distinguish gut microbiomes.

Author information

1
1] Department of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, Dale Hall Tower, 521 Norman, Oklahoma 73019, USA [2] Universidad Científica del Sur, Lima 18, Perú [3] City of Hope, NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California 91010, USA.
2
1] Department of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, Dale Hall Tower, 521 Norman, Oklahoma 73019, USA [2] Universidad Científica del Sur, Lima 18, Perú
3
City of Hope, NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California 91010, USA.
4
Department of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, Dale Hall Tower, 521 Norman, Oklahoma 73019, USA.
5
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA.
6
Departments of Pediatrics and Computer Science &Engineering University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
7
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104, USA.
8
Instituto Nacional de Salud, Lima 11, Perú
9
Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529, USA.
10
Universidad Científica del Sur, Lima 18, Perú

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that gut microbiomes of urban-industrialized societies are different from those of traditional peoples. Here we examine the relationship between lifeways and gut microbiota through taxonomic and functional potential characterization of faecal samples from hunter-gatherer and traditional agriculturalist communities in Peru and an urban-industrialized community from the US. We find that in addition to taxonomic and metabolic differences between urban and traditional lifestyles, hunter-gatherers form a distinct sub-group among traditional peoples. As observed in previous studies, we find that Treponema are characteristic of traditional gut microbiomes. Moreover, through genome reconstruction (2.2-2.5 MB, coverage depth × 26-513) and functional potential characterization, we discover these Treponema are diverse, fall outside of pathogenic clades and are similar to Treponema succinifaciens, a known carbohydrate metabolizer in swine. Gut Treponema are found in non-human primates and all traditional peoples studied to date, suggesting they are symbionts lost in urban-industrialized societies.

PMID:
25807110
PMCID:
PMC4386023
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms7505
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center