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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2015 Mar 24;9(3):e0003611. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003611. eCollection 2015 Mar.

Signatures of adaptation in human invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 populations from sub-Saharan Africa.

Author information

1
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
2
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Institute for Molecular Infection Biology, University of Wurzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany.
3
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
4
The Roslin Institute & Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, Scotland, United Kingdom.
5
Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrokes Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
6
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Two lineages of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) of multi-locus sequence type ST313 have been linked with the emergence of invasive Salmonella disease across sub-Saharan Africa. The expansion of these lineages has a temporal association with the HIV pandemic and antibiotic usage. We analysed the whole genome sequence of 129 ST313 isolates representative of the two lineages and found evidence of lineage-specific genome degradation, with some similarities to that observed in S. Typhi. Individual ST313 S. Typhimurium isolates exhibit a distinct metabolic signature and modified enteropathogenesis in both a murine and cattle model of colitis, compared to S. Typhimurium outside of the ST313 lineages. These data define phenotypes that distinguish ST313 isolates from other S. Typhimurium and may represent adaptation to a distinct pathogenesis and lifestyle linked to an-immuno-compromised human population.

PMID:
25803844
PMCID:
PMC4372345
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0003611
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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