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Nucleic Acids Res. 2015 Apr 20;43(7):3407-19. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv226. Epub 2015 Mar 23.

Advances in CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering: lessons learned from RNA interference.

Author information

1
Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA.
2
Dharmacon, part of GE Healthcare, Lafayette, CO 80026, USA.
3
Division of Molecular Genome Analysis, and Genomic & Proteomics Core Facility, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
4
The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Institute of Molecular Medicine, University Hospital, University of Bonn, 53128 Bonn, Germany.
6
Dharmacon, part of GE Healthcare, Lafayette, CO 80026, USA anja.smith@ge.com.

Abstract

The discovery that the machinery of the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 bacterial immune system can be re-purposed to easily create deletions, insertions and replacements in the mammalian genome has revolutionized the field of genome engineering and re-invigorated the field of gene therapy. Many parallels have been drawn between the newly discovered CRISPR-Cas9 system and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in terms of their utility for understanding and interrogating gene function in mammalian cells. Given this similarity, the CRISPR-Cas9 field stands to benefit immensely from lessons learned during the development of RNAi technology. We examine how the history of RNAi can inform today's challenges in CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering such as efficiency, specificity, high-throughput screening and delivery for in vivo and therapeutic applications.

PMID:
25800748
PMCID:
PMC4402539
DOI:
10.1093/nar/gkv226
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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