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PLoS One. 2015 Mar 23;10(3):e0122234. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0122234. eCollection 2015.

Difference in the breast milk proteome between allergic and non-allergic mothers.

Author information

1
Dairy Science and Technology, Food Quality and Design group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
2
Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
3
University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Pediatric Allergology, Beatrix Children's Hospital, GRIAC Research Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
4
University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonology, GRIAC research institute, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
5
Center for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Breastfeeding has been linked to a reduction in the prevalence of allergy and asthma. However, studies on this relationship vary in outcome, which may partly be related to differences in breast milk composition. In particular breast milk composition may differ between allergic and non-allergic mothers. Important components that may be involved are breast milk proteins, as these are known to regulate immune development in the newborn. The objective of this study was therefore to explore differences in the proteins of breast milk from 20 allergic and non-allergic mothers. The results from this comparison may then be used to generate hypotheses on proteins associated with allergy in their offspring.

METHODS:

Milk samples from allergic and non-allergic mothers were obtained from the PIAMA project, a prospective birth cohort study on incidence, risk factors, and prevention of asthma and inhalant allergy. Non-targeted proteomics technology, based on liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, was used to compare breast milk from allergic and non-allergic mothers.

RESULTS:

Nineteen proteins, out of a total of 364 proteins identified in both groups, differed significantly in concentration between the breast milk of allergic and non-allergic mothers. Protease inhibitors and apolipoproteins were present in much higher concentrations in breast milk of allergic than non-allergic mothers. These proteins have been suggested to be linked to allergy and asthma.

CONCLUSIONS:

The non-targeted milk proteomic analysis employed has provided new targets for future studies on the relation between breast milk composition and allergy.

PMID:
25798592
PMCID:
PMC4370490
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0122234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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