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Brain Behav. 2015 Apr;5(4):e00319. doi: 10.1002/brb3.319. Epub 2015 Feb 17.

Regional differences of [(18)F]-FDG uptake within the brain during fatiguing muscle contractions.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado.
2
Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital Turku, Finland.
3
Department of Physical Performance, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Many studies have shown that a position task is more difficult than a force task although both are performed at a similar net muscle force. Thus, the time to task failure is consistently shown to be briefer during the position task. The contributions of the central nervous system to these two types of fatiguing contractions are not completely understood. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine differences in regional brain activity between force and position tasks using positron emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG).

METHODS:

Two participants performed both a force and position task, separated by 7 days, with the elbow flexor muscles at 15% maximal voluntary contraction force. During both tasks, each participant was injected with ≈ 256 (SD 11) MBq of FDG. Immediately after both tasks PET imaging was performed and images were analyzed to determine FDG uptake within regions of the brain.

RESULTS:

FDG uptake was greater in the occipital and temporal cortices of the brain during the position task compared to the force task.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that differences in visual-spatial feedback and processing may play a role in the reduced time to failure of position tasks. Future application of these findings may lead to improved designs of rehabilitative strategies involving different types of visual feedback.

KEYWORDS:

[18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose; performance fatigability; positron emission tomography (PET); skeletal muscle fatigue; statistical parametric mapping (SPM)

PMID:
25798334
PMCID:
PMC4356841
DOI:
10.1002/brb3.319
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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