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J Dent. 2015 May;43(5):525-36. doi: 10.1016/j.jdent.2015.03.004. Epub 2015 Mar 20.

Bonding of universal adhesives to dentine--Old wine in new bottles?

Author information

1
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University; Department of Operative Dentistry & Endodontics, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.
3
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University; Department of Prosthodontics, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
4
Department of Prosthodontics, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
5
The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) & Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Ministry of Education, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
6
State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China. Electronic address: jhchen@fmmu.edu.cn.
7
Department of Oral Biology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA.
8
Department of Endodontics, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA. Electronic address: ftay@gru.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Multi-mode universal adhesives offer clinicians the choice of using the etch-and-rinse technique, selective enamel etch technique or self-etch technique to bond to tooth substrates. The present study examined the short-term in vitro performance of five universal adhesives bonded to human coronal dentine.

METHODS:

Two hundred non-carious human third molars were assigned to five groups based on the type of the universal adhesives (Prime&Bond Elect, Scotchbond Universal, All-Bond Universal, Clearfil Universal Bond and Futurabond U). Two bonding modes (etch-and-rinse and self-etch) were employed for each adhesive group. Bonded specimens were stored in deionized water for 24h or underwent a 10,000-cycle thermocycling ageing process prior to testing (N=10). Microtensile bond testing (μTBS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of resin-dentine interfaces in non-thermocycled specimens and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of tracer-infused water-rich zones within hybrid layers of thermocycled specimens were performed.

RESULTS:

Both adhesive type and testing condition (with/without thermocycling) have significant influences on μTBS. The use of each adhesive in either the etch-and-rinse or self-etch application mode did not result in significantly different μTBS to dentine. Hybrid layers created by these adhesives in the etch-and-rinse bonding mode and self-etch bonding mode were ∼5μm and ≤0.5μm thick respectively. Tracer-infused regions could be identified within the resin-dentine interface from all the specimens prepared.

CONCLUSION:

The increase in versatility of universal adhesives is not accompanied by technological advances for overcoming the challenges associated with previous generations of adhesives. Therapeutic adhesives with bio-protective and bio-promoting effects are still lacking in commercialized adhesives.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

Universal adhesives represent manufacturers' attempt to introduce versatility in product design via adaptation of a single-bottle self-etch adhesive for other application modes without compromising its bonding effectiveness.

KEYWORDS:

Bond strength; Dentine; Nanoleakage; Universal adhesives

PMID:
25797702
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdent.2015.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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