Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Pollut. 2015 Jun;201:141-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.02.026. Epub 2015 Mar 20.

Quantifying the effect of vegetation on near-road air quality using brief campaigns.

Author information

1
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Gruman Hall, Ithaca, NY, USA.
2
Section of Horticulture, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Room 23 Plant Science Building, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Electronic address: thw2@cornell.edu.
3
Section of Horticulture, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Room 23 Plant Science Building, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
4
New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 630 West North Street, Geneva, NY 14456, USA.

Abstract

Many reports of trees' impacts on urban air quality neglect pattern and process at the landscape scale. Here, we describe brief campaigns to quantify the effect of trees on the dispersion of airborne particulates using high time resolution measurements along short transects away from roads. Campaigns near major highways in Queens, NY showed frequent, stochastic spikes in PM2.5. The polydisperse PM2.5 class poorly represented the behavior of discrete classes. A transect across a lawn with trees had fewer spikes in PM2.5 concentration but decreased more gradually than a transect crossing a treeless lawn. This coincided with decreased Turbulence Kinetic Energy downwind of trees, indicating recirculation, longer residence times and decreased dispersion. Simply planting trees can increase local pollution concentrations, which is a special concern if the intent is to protect vulnerable populations. Emphasizing deposition to leaf surfaces obscures the dominant impact of aerodynamics on local concentration.

KEYWORDS:

Aerodynamics; Dispersion; Near-road air pollution; PM(2.5); Trees

PMID:
25797683
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2015.02.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center