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Nicotine Tob Res. 2016 Mar;18(3):314-20. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntv061. Epub 2015 Mar 19.

Cross-Cultural Adaptation of a Text Message-Based Program for Smoking Cessation in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; lisandro.colantonio@fulbrightmail.org.
2
Centro de Estudios de Estado y Sociedad, Buenos Aires, Argentina;
3
National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
4
School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Centro de Estudios de Estado y Sociedad, Buenos Aires, Argentina;

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Few individual-level nonpharmacological interventions are available in Argentina to support smokers who attempt to quit.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-cultural adaptation of Stop Smoking with Mobile Phones, an English text message-based tobacco cessation program, in Buenos Aires. The process included English-Spanish translation and back-translation, face validity checking by two local tobacco cessation experts, and a complete review using a structured questionnaire and discussion groups with potential users (current smokers who want to quit or former smokers who quit in the past 6 months). An editing group was responsible for analyzing information collected and preparing adapted messages. Readability of final messages was assessed.

RESULTS:

Tobacco cessation experts found translated messages suitable for the local setting, although mention of "mate" (a local infusion which can trigger cravings) was recommended. Review of messages by two potential users confirmed most of the messages would help smokers to quit and resulted in minor edits. Potential users who participated in two discussion groups (n = 17, 64.7% female, age range: 30-73) found the content of messages was relevant for cessation and related to their own experiences, although they suggested adding information regarding the negative consequences of smoking. Participants emphasized that messages should be formatted using voseo and informal style and provided feedback on specific words and expressions. Readability of final messages was easy/very easy (Fernández Huerta Index: 79.93).

CONCLUSION:

The cross-cultural adaptation of Stop Smoking with Mobile Phones resulted in relevant revisions for the study population, including tone, wording, and pertinent information (eg, smoking consequences). Local acceptability and effectiveness should be confirmed in future studies.

PMID:
25795658
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/ntv061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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