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J Prosthet Dent. 2015 May;113(5):493-7. doi: 10.1016/j.prosdent.2015.01.004. Epub 2015 Mar 18.

Use of an obturator with nCPAP in a premature infant with a cleft lip and palate.

Author information

1
Associate Professor, Department of Restorative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Electronic address: Igor.Pesun@umanitoba.ca.
2
Neonatal Clinical Specialist, Department of Respiratory Therapy, Children's Hospital, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
3
Neonatologist, Health Science Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
4
Nurse Practitioner, Centre for Craniofacial Differences, Children's Hospital, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
5
Associate Professor, Department of Restorative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Abstract

Premature infants have underdeveloped lungs and their care involves the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). For an adequate amount of oxygen to enter the lungs, the palate needs to be intact. Premature infants with a cleft lip and palate remain intubated for extended periods of time with the risks inherent in long-term intubation because of the inability to maintain nCPAP. This paper describes the fabrication of a custom-designed obturator attached to nCPAP variable flow generator tubing for a premature infant with a unilateral cleft lip and palate.

PMID:
25794910
DOI:
10.1016/j.prosdent.2015.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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