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PLoS One. 2015 Mar 20;10(3):e0119724. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0119724. eCollection 2015.

Strigolactone regulates anthocyanin accumulation, acid phosphatases production and plant growth under low phosphate condition in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Applied Bioscience, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Vienna, Austria.
4
Genome Research Center, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Applied Bioscience, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Biochemistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Phosphate is an essential macronutrient in plant growth and development; however, the concentration of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in soil is often suboptimal for crop performance. Accordingly, plants have developed physiological strategies to adapt to low Pi availability. Here, we report that typical Pi starvation responses in Arabidopsis are partially dependent on the strigolactone (SL) signaling pathway. SL treatment induced root hair elongation, anthocyanin accumulation, activation of acid phosphatase, and reduced plant weight, which are characteristic responses to phosphate starvation. Furthermore, the expression profile of SL-response genes correlated with the expression of genes induced by Pi starvation. These results suggest a potential overlap between SL signaling and Pi starvation signaling pathways in plants.

PMID:
25793732
PMCID:
PMC4368578
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0119724
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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