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World J Orthop. 2015 Mar 18;6(2):211-20. doi: 10.5312/wjo.v6.i2.211. eCollection 2015 Mar 18.

Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

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1
Amir M Abtahi, Erin K Granger, Robert Z Tashjian, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, United States.

Abstract

Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair.

KEYWORDS:

Healing; Repair; Rotator cuff tear; Shoulder; Tendon

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