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Science. 2015 Mar 20;347(6228):1367-671. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa3380.

Translation. An RNA biosensor for imaging the first round of translation from single cells to living animals.

Author information

1
Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, CH-4058 Basel, Switzerland.
2
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Transcription Imaging Consortium, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.
3
Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, CH-4058 Basel, Switzerland. University of Basel, CH-4003 Basel, Switzerland.
4
Developmental Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
5
Developmental Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. ephrussi@embl.de robert.singer@einstein.yu.edu jeffrey.chao@fmi.ch.
6
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Transcription Imaging Consortium, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA. ephrussi@embl.de robert.singer@einstein.yu.edu jeffrey.chao@fmi.ch.
7
Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, CH-4058 Basel, Switzerland. Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. ephrussi@embl.de robert.singer@einstein.yu.edu jeffrey.chao@fmi.ch.

Abstract

Analysis of single molecules in living cells has provided quantitative insights into the kinetics of fundamental biological processes; however, the dynamics of messenger RNA (mRNA) translation have yet to be addressed. We have developed a fluorescence microscopy technique that reports on the first translation events of individual mRNA molecules. This allowed us to examine the spatiotemporal regulation of translation during normal growth and stress and during Drosophila oocyte development. We have shown that mRNAs are not translated in the nucleus but translate within minutes after export, that sequestration within P-bodies regulates translation, and that oskar mRNA is not translated until it reaches the posterior pole of the oocyte. This methodology provides a framework for studying initiation of protein synthesis on single mRNAs in living cells.

PMID:
25792328
PMCID:
PMC4451088
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaa3380
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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