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Wilderness Environ Med. 2015 Sep;26(3):355-8. doi: 10.1016/j.wem.2015.01.005. Epub 2015 Mar 16.

Management of a Pediatric Snake Envenomation After Presentation With a Tight Tourniquet.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC. Electronic address: seanbushmd@gmail.com.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC.

Abstract

We describe an illustrative case of pediatric snake envenomation presenting with a tightly wound tourniquet. A 10-year-old boy presented after a snake bite to the right calf. A tourniquet was in place just below the right knee. The species of snake was unknown. The patient was hemodynamically stable, but the entirety of the right leg distal to the tourniquet was discolored. Over concern for a potential venom bolus effect upon tourniquet removal, the decision was made to start a crotaline Fab antivenom infusion and gradually loosen the tourniquet. The patient tolerated the infusion and removal of the tourniquet without signs of anaphylaxis or decompensation. Dynamic improvements were observed in the right leg and wound site that appeared to be the result of vascular congestion. Tourniquets are generally not recommended for snakebites; however, if a tourniquet is already placed, we avoid removal until prepared to manage acute toxicity or immediate hypersensitivity.

KEYWORDS:

bite; envenomation; envenoming; snake; tourniquet; venom

PMID:
25792002
DOI:
10.1016/j.wem.2015.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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