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Am J Pathol. 2015 May;185(5):1275-85. doi: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2015.01.028. Epub 2015 Mar 17.

Novel robust in vitro hepatitis B virus infection model using fresh human hepatocytes isolated from humanized mice.

Author information

1
Department of Research and Development, PhoenixBio Co., Ltd., Hiroshima, Japan; Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.
2
Department of Research and Development, PhoenixBio Co., Ltd., Hiroshima, Japan.
3
Division of Frontier Medical Science, Department of Medical and Molecular Science, Programs for Biomedical Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.
4
Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; Division of Frontier Medical Science, Department of Medical and Molecular Science, Programs for Biomedical Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Saitama, Japan.
6
Department of Research and Development, PhoenixBio Co., Ltd., Hiroshima, Japan; Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. Electronic address: chise.mukaidani@phoenixbio.co.jp.

Abstract

The molecular mechanisms underlying the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle are poorly understood because of the lack of appropriate in vitro infection models. Herein, we report a highly effective in vitro HBV infection system using fresh human hepatocytes (HHs) isolated from chimeric mice with humanized livers. After the inoculation of sera collected from HBV-infected chimeric mice or patients to HHs, we measured levels of HBV DNA, mRNA, covalently closed circular DNA, and viral protein expression in HHs. We investigated the neutralization activity of hepatitis B immune globulin and the effects of siRNA against sodium taurocholate-cotransporting polypeptide and clathrin heavy chain on HBV infection. We confirmed the expression of viral antigens in HHs and the presence of extracellular HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen. The maximum infection rate was approximately 80%. Lamivudine and hepatitis B immune globulin treatment reduced HBV DNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of sodium taurocholate-cotransporting polypeptide and clathrin heavy chain significantly reduced the levels of hepatitis B surface antigen. Infection was successfully established using different donor HHs and inocula. Elevation of extracellular HBV DNA levels and the increase of HBV-positive HHs were blocked by continuous hepatitis B immune globulin treatment, indicating virus spread in this model. Chimeric mouse-derived HHs provide a robust in vitro infection model that can completely support the HBV life cycle.

PMID:
25791527
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajpath.2015.01.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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