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Ann Epidemiol. 2015 Jul;25(7):505-11. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.02.003. Epub 2015 Feb 12.

Response of biomarkers of inflammation and coagulation to short-term changes in central site, local, and predicted particle number concentrations.

Author information

1
Division of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta. Electronic address: cfuller@gsu.edu.
2
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA.
4
Exposure Science Division, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ.
5
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
6
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Previous studies have reported acute (hours-28 days) associations between ambient ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter <0.1) and biomarkers of cardiovascular health using central site data. We evaluated particle number concentration (a proxy measure for UFP) measured at a central site, a local near-highway site and predicted residential concentrations with response of biomarkers of inflammation and coagulation in a near-highway population.

METHODS:

Participants provided two blood samples for analysis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II, and fibrinogen. Mixed effect models were used to evaluate the association between PNC levels on the same day, prior 2 days, and moving averages of 3 to 28 days.

RESULTS:

Estimated effects on biomarkers of a 5000 unit increase in central site PNC generally increased with longer averaging times for IL-6, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. Effect estimates were highest for a 28-day moving average, with 91% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9, 230) higher IL-6 levels, 74% (95% CI: -7, 220) higher hs-CRP levels, and 59% (95% CI: -13, 130) higher fibrinogen levels. We observed no clear trend between near-highway or predicted residential PNC and any of the biomarkers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Only central site PNC increased blood markers of inflammation while near-highway and predicted residential values did not. We cannot fully explain this result, although differing PNC composition is a possibility. Future studies would assist in understanding these findings.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular; Coagulation; Highway; Inflammation; Particles

PMID:
25791025
PMCID:
PMC4457635
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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