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Food Microbiol. 2015 Jun;48:89-98. doi: 10.1016/j.fm.2014.12.007. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

The inhibitory effects of sorbate and benzoate against Clostridium perfringens type A isolates.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA.
2
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand.
3
Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA; Laboratorio de Mecanismos de Patogénesis Bacteriana, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago, Chile.
4
Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA; Department of Microbiology, College of Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA. Electronic address: sarkerm@oregonstate.edu.

Abstract

This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of sorbate and benzoate against Clostridium perfringens type A food poisoning (FP) and non-food-borne (NFB) disease isolates. No significant inhibition of germination of spores of both FP and NFB isolates was observed in rich medium (pH 7.0) supplemented with permissive level of sodium sorbate (0.3% ≈ 0.13 mM undissociated sorbic acid) or sodium benzoate (0.1% ≈ 0.01 mM undissociated benzoic acid) used in foods. However, these levels of sorbate and benzoate effectively arrested outgrowth of germinated C. perfringens spores in rich medium. Lowering the pH of the medium increases the inhibitory effects of sorbate and benzoate against germination of spores of NFB isolates, and outgrowth of spores of both FP and NFB isolates. Furthermore, sorbate and benzoate inhibited vegetative growth of C. perfringens isolates. However, the permissible levels of these organic salts could not control the growth of C. perfringens spores in chicken meat stored under extremely abusive conditions. In summary, although sorbate and benzoate showed inhibitory activities against C. perfringens in the rich medium, no such effect was observed in cooked chicken meat. Therefore, caution should be taken when applying these organic salts into meat products to reduce or eliminate C. perfringens spores.

KEYWORDS:

Benzoate; Clostridium perfringens; Inhibition; Sorbate; Spores

PMID:
25790996
DOI:
10.1016/j.fm.2014.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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