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Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2015 May;188:61-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2015.02.003. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Platelet function in patients with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriage who subsequently miscarry again.

Author information

1
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland. Electronic address: mdempsey@rcsi.ie.
2
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was designed to evaluate platelet aggregation in pregnant women with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) and to compare platelet function in such patients who go on to have either another subsequent miscarriage or a successful pregnancy.

STUDY DESIGN:

A prospective longitudinal study was performed to evaluate platelet function in a cohort of patients with a history of unexplained RM. Platelet reactivity testing was performed at 4-7 weeks gestation, to compare platelet aggregation between those with a subsequent miscarriage and those who had successful live birth outcomes. Platelet aggregation was calculated using a modified assay of light transmission aggregometry with multiple agonists at different concentrations.

RESULTS:

In a cohort of 39 patients with a history of RM, 30 had a successful pregnancy outcome while nine had a subsequent miscarriage again. Women with subsequent miscarriage had reduced platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (P value 0.0012) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (P value 0.0334) when compared to those with successful pregnancies. Women with subsequent miscarriages also had a trend towards reduced platelet aggregation in response to epinephrine (P value 0.0568).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with a background history of unexplained RM demonstrate reduced platelet function if they have a subsequent miscarriage compared to those who go on to have a successful pregnancy.

KEYWORDS:

Platelet aggregation; Recurrent miscarriage

PMID:
25790916
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejogrb.2015.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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