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Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2015 Jan;4(1):60-4. doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2014.10.003. Epub 2014 Nov 7.

Epstein-Barr virus candidate genes and multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA, USA; Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women׳s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis, 460 Totten Pond Road, Waltham, MA, USA.
3
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA, USA; Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women׳s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: aascheri@hsph.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and a history of infectious mononucleosis (IM) have been previously associated with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). Whether there are common genetic factors that may partially explain these associations has not been thoroughly explored.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether select polymorphisms in genes associated with IM susceptibility are related to MS risk-a self-reported history of IM or antibody titer against Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (anti-EBNA1).

METHODS:

A case-control study including 1213 MS cases and 454 controls enrolled in the Accelerated Cure Project for MS (ACP) Repository. Select polymorphisms in HLA-A, SH2D1A and IL15RA and anti-EBNA1 Ab titers were measured using stored blood samples provided by participants. Generalized linear models were used to assess the associations between select polymorphisms and odds of MS, odds of IM or anti-EBNA1 Ab titers.

RESULTS:

No significant associations were observed between the selected polymorphisms and odds of MS, odds of IM or anti-EBNA1 Ab titer.

CONCLUSION:

It is unlikely that any of the studied polymorphisms contribute to the explaining the association between anti-EBNA1 Ab titer or history of IM and MS.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Epstein–Barr virus; Gene; Infectious mononucleosis; Multiple sclerosis; Single nucleotide polymorphisms

PMID:
25787055
DOI:
10.1016/j.msard.2014.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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