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J Infect Dis. 2015 Oct 1;212 Suppl 2:S101-8. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiv063. Epub 2015 Mar 18.

Seroepidemiological Prevalence of Multiple Species of Filoviruses in Fruit Bats (Eidolon helvum) Migrating in Africa.

Author information

1
Hokudai Center for Zoonosis Control in Zambia Departments of Disease Control.
2
Divisions of Global Epidemiology.
3
Departments of Disease Control Collaboration and Education.
4
Departments of Disease Control Molecular Pathobiology Global Station for Zoonosis Control, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
5
Divisions of Global Epidemiology Global Station for Zoonosis Control, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
6
Departments of Disease Control.
7
Paraclinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance, Chuo Kikuu, Morogoro, Tanzania.
8
Paraclinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka.
9
Zambia Wildlife Authority, Chilanga.
10
Bioinformatics, Research Center for Zoonosis Control Global Station for Zoonosis Control, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
11
Laboratory of Virology, Division of Intramural Research, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana.
12
Departments of Disease Control Collaboration and Education Global Station for Zoonosis Control, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
13
Hokudai Center for Zoonosis Control in Zambia Paraclinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka.
14
Departments of Disease Control Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance, Chuo Kikuu, Morogoro, Tanzania.
15
Departments of Disease Control Divisions of Global Epidemiology Global Station for Zoonosis Control, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

Abstract

Fruit bats are suspected to be a natural reservoir of filoviruses, including Ebola and Marburg viruses. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the viral glycoprotein antigens, we detected filovirus-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in 71 of 748 serum samples collected from migratory fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) in Zambia during 2006-2013. Although antibodies to African filoviruses (eg, Zaire ebolavirus) were most prevalent, some serum samples showed distinct specificity for Reston ebolavirus, which that has thus far been found only in Asia. Interestingly, the transition of filovirus species causing outbreaks in Central and West Africa during 2005-2014 seemed to be synchronized with the change of the serologically dominant virus species in these bats. These data suggest the introduction of multiple species of filoviruses in the migratory bat population and point to the need for continued surveillance of filovirus infection of wild animals in sub-Saharan Africa, including hitherto nonendemic countries.

KEYWORDS:

Ebola virus; Marburg virus; Zambia; filovirus; fruit bat; specific antibody

PMID:
25786916
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiv063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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