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J Oral Rehabil. 2015 Aug;42(8):571-9. doi: 10.1111/joor.12293. Epub 2015 Mar 19.

Effect of visual biofeedback of posterior tongue movement on articulation rehabilitation in dysarthria patients.

Author information

1
Department of Occlusal and Oral Functional Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan.
2
Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Therapy, Rehabilitation Center, Kawasaki Medical School Hospital, Kurashiki, Japan.
3
Oisaka Electronic Device Ltd, Fukuyama, Japan.
4
Department of Sensory Science, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Kurashiki, Japan.
5
Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Kurashiki, Japan.

Abstract

Articulation is driven by various combinations of movements of the lip, tongue, soft palate, pharynx and larynx, where the tongue plays an especially important role. In patients with cerebrovascular disorder, lingual motor function is often affected, causing dysarthria. We aimed to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback of posterior tongue movement on articulation rehabilitation in dysarthria patients with cerebrovascular disorder. Fifteen dysarthria patients (10 men and 5 women; mean age, 70.7 ± 10.3 years) agreed to participate in this study. A device for measuring the movement of the posterior part of the tongue was used for the visual biofeedback. Subjects were instructed to produce repetitive articulation of [ka] as fast and steadily as possible between a lungful with/without visual biofeedback. For both the unaffected and affected sides, the range of ascending and descending movement of the posterior tongue with visual biofeedback was significantly larger than that without visual biofeedback. The coefficient of variation for these movements with visual biofeedback was significantly smaller than that without visual biofeedback. With visual biofeedback, the range of ascent exhibited a significant and strong correlation with that of descent for both the unaffected and affected sides. The results of this study revealed that the use of visual biofeedback leads to prompt and preferable change in the movement of the posterior part of the tongue. From the standpoint of pursuing necessary rehabilitation for patients with attention and memory disorders, visualization of tongue movement would be of marked clinical benefit.

KEYWORDS:

articulation; dysarthria; rehabilitation; tongue movement; visual biofeedback

PMID:
25786577
DOI:
10.1111/joor.12293
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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