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Science. 2015 Mar 20;347(6228):1349-52. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa2397. Epub 2015 Mar 16.

Additive manufacturing. Continuous liquid interface production of 3D objects.

Author information

1
Carbon3D Inc., Redwood City, CA 94063, USA.
2
Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
3
Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University.
4
Carbon3D Inc., Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. alex@carbon3d.com et@unc.edu desimone@email.unc.edu.
5
Carbon3D Inc., Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. alex@carbon3d.com et@unc.edu desimone@email.unc.edu.
6
Carbon3D Inc., Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA. alex@carbon3d.com et@unc.edu desimone@email.unc.edu.

Abstract

Additive manufacturing processes such as 3D printing use time-consuming, stepwise layer-by-layer approaches to object fabrication. We demonstrate the continuous generation of monolithic polymeric parts up to tens of centimeters in size with feature resolution below 100 micrometers. Continuous liquid interface production is achieved with an oxygen-permeable window below the ultraviolet image projection plane, which creates a "dead zone" (persistent liquid interface) where photopolymerization is inhibited between the window and the polymerizing part. We delineate critical control parameters and show that complex solid parts can be drawn out of the resin at rates of hundreds of millimeters per hour. These print speeds allow parts to be produced in minutes instead of hours.

PMID:
25780246
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaa2397
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