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J Rheumatol. 2015 May;42(5):870-8. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.140429. Epub 2015 Mar 15.

Effectiveness of total contact insoles in patients with plantar fasciitis.

Author information

1
From the Rheumatology Division, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.H.V. Oliveira, PT, MSc; A. Jones, PT, PhD; E. Moreira, PT, MSc; F. Jennings, MD, PhD; J. Natour, MD, PhD, Rheumatology Division, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo.
2
From the Rheumatology Division, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.H.V. Oliveira, PT, MSc; A. Jones, PT, PhD; E. Moreira, PT, MSc; F. Jennings, MD, PhD; J. Natour, MD, PhD, Rheumatology Division, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo. jnatour@unifesp.br.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effectiveness of total contact insoles (TCI) in patients with plantar fasciitis (PF).

METHODS:

A double-blind randomized controlled trial was carried out with intention-to-treat analysis. Seventy-four patients were randomly allocated to use a TCI made of ethylene vinyl acetate (study group, n = 37) or a flat insole (control group, n = 37). The following assessment tools were used: visual analog scale for pain while walking and at rest, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) for quality of life, Foot Function Index and Foot Health Status Questionnaire for foot function, 6-min walk test (6MWT), and baropodometer FootWalk Pro for plantar pressure analysis. The groups were evaluated by a blinded assessor at baseline and after 45, 90, and 180 days.

RESULTS:

The groups were homogeneous for the majority of variables at baseline. The over-time comparisons show a statistical difference between the groups for pain while walking (p = 0.008) and the 6MWT (p = 0.010). Both groups showed significant improvements in pain at rest, foot function, and some quality of life variables (physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality, and social functioning), with no significant statistical differences between them. The baropodometer recorded no changes from the use of the insoles.

CONCLUSION:

A TCI can be used to reduce pain while walking and to increase walking distance in individuals with PF.

KEYWORDS:

FOOT; GAIT; ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES; PAIN; PLANTAR FASCIITIS

PMID:
25774062
DOI:
10.3899/jrheum.140429
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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